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what mmorgp is legal?

Smoke & Fly
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Habbo isn't illegal.
All official MMORPG's are legal.
/thread?
 
HAARP
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Simple answer: if you just play on the official ones then it's legal but if you run them without permission from the owners of the content then you're on the illegal side.
If you play on illegal servers (retro servers, habbo emulators) then it's not exactly legal but the company will just take action on the people hosting it.
 
Newbie Spellweaver
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but are there any mmorpg that now doesnt more exists but we have the source?, that arent ilegal to run a outdated mmorgp
 
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i have seen a game that when you acces the web it doesnt exists more, then the source cannot be ilegal, if it doesnt more exists.
 
Skilled Illusionist
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If you're running it, and it ain't official, it is illegal. Simple.
 
Ginger by design.
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Running an emulator isn't illegal. Running stolen or leaked server files without permission is, however. A server emulator which is created by directly reverse engineering the real server binaries is illegal (duh). But a server made by analyzing packets and writing code that handles them the same way the real server does is not illegal to host in any way.
 
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Running an emulator isn't illegal. Running stolen or leaked server files without permission is, however. A server emulator which is created by directly reverse engineering the real server binaries is illegal (duh). But a server made by analyzing packets and writing code that handles them the same way the real server does is not illegal to host in any way.

Wrong. The packets are coding and it is against copyright laws to use them without consent of the creator.

If you are using an official client to connect to the server, it is still illegal.

Hell, even if you decided to code your own client it would still break intellectual property laws as the game content is entirely owned by the company.

No matter what way you cut it, private servers are entirely and always illegal.
 
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Wrong. The packets are coding and it is against copyright laws to use them without consent of the creator.

If you are using an official client to connect to the server, it is still illegal.

Hell, even if you decided to code your own client it would still break intellectual property laws as the game content is entirely owned by the company.

No matter what way you cut it, private servers are entirely and always illegal.
Agree :):


♠NicK♠
 
Ginger by design.
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Wrong. The packets are coding and it is against copyright laws to use them without consent of the creator.

Packets are not coding. They form a protocol, also classified as an idea, process, or method of operation.

If you are using an official client to connect to the server, it is still illegal.

Not if you obtained that copy of the client legally. Copyright law extends to the actual client and content only. If you purchased or otherwise legally obtained that copy, you aren't infringing copyright. Even if the server you're connecting to are stolen/copied "official" binaries, you aren't infringing anything by connecting to them.

Hell, even if you decided to code your own client it would still break intellectual property laws as the game content is entirely owned by the company.

No matter what way you cut it, private servers are entirely and always illegal.

IP laws cover copyrights, trademarks, patents, trade secrets and a few other things. Of course, you could potentially violate trademarks or patents, and if you aren't careful in reverse engineering (rather than just reimplementing), you could violate trade secrets. And if you use any of their content (read: actual files or data), you're violating copyright law. But writing your own client does not constitute a violation of any of these in its own right.

Emulators are not illegal, nor do they intrinsically break any laws. This is why no company has ever, EVER nor will EVER successfully sue a company just for writing an emulator. They may threaten the hosters with DMCA notices but this is just a bully tactic. It's been shown if you actually lawyer up, countersue for court costs, and pursue the litigation, they back down because there's no case at all. They're just trying to scare an ISP into bringing down a site.

Blizzard, if you read their statements about bringing down emulator servers and addresses to the community, only mentions that the copying of clients is violating copyright law (which it is).

Let me quote the copyright law for you:

§ 102. Subject matter of copyright: In general

(a) Copyright protection subsists, in accordance with this title, in original works of authorship fixed in any tangible medium of expression, now known or later developed, from which they can be perceived, reproduced, or otherwise communicated, either directly or with the aid of a machine or device. Works of authorship include the following categories:
(1) literary works;
(2) musical works, including any accompanying words;
(3) dramatic works, including any accompanying music;
(4) pantomimes and choreographic works;
(5) pictorial, graphic, and sculptural works;
(6) motion pictures and other audiovisual works;
(7) sound recordings; and
(8) architectural works.
(b) In no case does copyright protection for an original work of authorship extend to any idea, procedure, process, system, method of operation, concept, principle, or discovery, regardless of the form in which it is described, explained, illustrated, or embodied in such work.

Further, now that we've established that a protocol is actually not copyrightable, let's take a look at the DMCA which is what most people are hit with these days for computer-based copyright violations:

`(f) REVERSE ENGINEERING- (1) Notwithstanding the provisions of subsection (a)(1)(A), a person who has lawfully obtained the right to use a copy of a computer program may circumvent a technological measure that effectively controls access to a particular portion of that program for the sole purpose of identifying and analyzing those elements of the program that are necessary to achieve interoperability of an independently created computer program with other programs, and that have not previously been readily available to the person engaging in the circumvention, to the extent any such acts of identification and analysis do not constitute infringement under this title.

And this protects you from being prosecuted for reverse engineering protection schemes in effect (like packers, protectors, encryptions, file formats, etc) that would otherwise prevent you from obtaining the information needed to achieve interoperability. There's a reason companies aren't suing independently created emulators for copyright violation -- unless you're distributing copyrighted files (database files with copyrighted information in them, the client, etc) you aren't violating copyright law. And reverse engineering their circumvention software, even if it breaks their AUP, is not violating any law either.
 
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Ginger by design.
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private servers are illegal

Find me one case where a company has sued and won a case against an organization for making a server emulator.

Let's see it. You can't call something illegal if there is no law that makes it illegal and no company has ever won in a court of law for it. Just because big bad game developers tell you it's against their "rules" (aka AUP which is a legally nonbinding agreement of use), and because they'll mass send DMCA violation notices to a hoster of an emulated server, doesn't mean anything.
 
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