Welcome!

Join our community of MMO enthusiasts and game developers! By registering, you'll gain access to discussions on the latest developments in MMO server files and collaborate with like-minded individuals. Join us today and unlock the potential of MMO server development!

Join Today!

needed another completed guide from chumpywumpy

Newbie Spellweaver
Joined
Aug 16, 2008
Messages
6
Reaction score
0
mate, i have follow all of ur guide and i feel like it's easy to understand from begin to the end. I would like to ask u another guide for update files from WinSCP to VMware if u could. i remember u said u are not going to make this guide, but i and other ppl really need ur help (i guess) hopefully, u could accepted my request.

Thanks for all of your hard work
 
Newbie Spellweaver
Joined
Aug 16, 2008
Messages
6
Reaction score
0
mate, i had follow step by step from Mahi's video, but i can't connect to the server.
 
Upvote 0
The Dinosaur
Loyal Member
Joined
Jun 29, 2008
Messages
5,028
Reaction score
999
The first thing to remember about any setup guide that involves networking is you never follow it step by step. You will always have to work out what the correct IP addresses to use for you network are rather than just putting in what is shown.

That is the problem with guides like this as whatever settings i put in the guides won't work for the majority of other people and this is why i try to stay away from putting networking settings in them, people take them too literally and miss out the bit where you have to learn how networks work. That just causes worse problems later on.

If you can't connect via WinSCP then either your centos firewall is on, you are trying to connect to the wrong ip address or your VMWare networking settings are wrong.

The first thing you need to do is learn how to use the "ping" command, both linux and windows have it and you use it via command prompt/terminal. Don't even bother loading WinSCP until you can ping the centos machine from Windows as it won't work.

Leave Centos networking set to auto (DHCP) and experiment with VMWare networking until you can ping centos. Do not manually change IP addresses or anything on your VMWare adaptors just try bridged and NAT.

The quickest way to learn is by experimentation when it comes to networking. If you want to learn it the guide way then you are looking at a few dozen pages about what all of the addresses mean in binary, netmasking, routing and a bunch of other stuff you normally only learn on expensive CISCO certification courses. There isn't a simple set of addresses that is right for everybody unfortunately.
 
Upvote 0
Newbie Spellweaver
Joined
Apr 25, 2007
Messages
37
Reaction score
0
The first thing to remember about any setup guide that involves networking is you never follow it step by step. You will always have to work out what the correct IP addresses to use for you network are rather than just putting in what is shown.

That is the problem with guides like this as whatever settings i put in the guides won't work for the majority of other people and this is why i try to stay away from putting networking settings in them, people take them too literally and miss out the bit where you have to learn how networks work. That just causes worse problems later on.

If you can't connect via WinSCP then either your centos firewall is on, you are trying to connect to the wrong ip address or your VMWare networking settings are wrong.

The first thing you need to do is learn how to use the "ping" command, both linux and windows have it and you use it via command prompt/terminal. Don't even bother loading WinSCP until you can ping the centos machine from Windows as it won't work.

Leave Centos networking set to auto (DHCP) and experiment with VMWare networking until you can ping centos. Do not manually change IP addresses or anything on your VMWare adaptors just try bridged and NAT.

The quickest way to learn is by experimentation when it comes to networking. If you want to learn it the guide way then you are looking at a few dozen pages about what all of the addresses mean in binary, netmasking, routing and a bunch of other stuff you normally only learn on expensive CISCO certification courses. There isn't a simple set of addresses that is right for everybody unfortunately.

This is entirely true. IMHO, if you really are stuck, then I don't feel that your the ideal person to be running a server like this anyway. If you get a problem, your going to be stuck without any idea on what to do.

Although I guess that is sort of what these forums are. Read up on networking basics, just so you can get a basic idea on what's going on, giving you a better understanding to tell us what the problem is.
 
Upvote 0
Back
Top